T-shirt and apparel glossarium 1

What is the direct to garment (DTG) process?
October 23, 2016
Design resources for t-shirt printing
October 23, 2016
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Blend A yarn or a fabric that is made up of more than one type of fiber.
50/50 50-percent cotton/50-percent polyester fabric; also referred to as “poly/cotton”.
90/1 90-percent cotton/ 10-percent polyester fabric.
Blanks Undecorated items or apparel; also refers to “blank” goods.
Bonded Fleece Multiple layers of fleece are bonded together with an adhesive, resin, foam or fusible membrane to form a higher functioning garment.
Bio Wash Also known as bio-polishing or enzyme treatment. This is a chemical process to remove short fibers from fabrics so that the finished fabrics can have a cleaner surface. The process weakens the fibers so that they are more readily to break off, thus improve the pilling resistance but at the same time reduce the bursting strength of the fabric. Since the treatment is done in an acidic condition and at high temperature, noticeable color change will be unavoidable so usually this process is done before dyeing.
Cotton Soft vegetable fiber obtained from the seedpod of the cotton plant.
Egyptian Cotton Cultivated in Egypt’s Nile River Valley, this cotton is regarded as one of the finest cotton in the world. The particular growing season gives the cotton the longest and strongest fibers, making it ideal for weaving into smooth, strong yarn. Commonly used in high-end towels and linens.

 

Enzyme Wash Washing process that uses a cellulose-based solution to obtain garments that appear to have been stonewashed or acid washed. The solution physically degrades the surface of the cotton fiber. The appearance and hand of the garment are identical to stonewashed and acid washed garments. However, the fabric surface is not damaged to the extent of a stonewashed or acid washed garment.

 

Fleece A fabric identified by a soft napped interior and a smooth exterior. Commonly used in sweats.

 

Garment Dyed A dyeing process that occurs after the garment is assembled.

 

Garment Wash Process of industrially washing garments after they have been manufactured to remove sizing; it also softens and pre-shrinks.
Garment Washed A wash process where softeners are added to finished garments to help the cotton fibers relax. The result is a fabric with a thicker appearance, reduced shrinkage and a softer hand.

 

Heavyweight Fabric heavier than 10 ounces per linear yard, equal to 1.60 yield. Standard weight in the industry is 8 ounces (2.0 yield) or lighter.
NuBlend Fleece A combined knitting and spinning process, with fabric made of 50% cotton and 50% polyester, with an anti-pilling surface. Nylon A synthetic fiber with high strength and abrasion resistance, low absorbency and good elasticity.
Over-Dyed A process in which yarn-dyed fabrics or piece-dyed garments are put through an additional dye color to create unique colors.

 

Piece-Dyed Pigment-Dyed A type of dye process used to create a distressed or washed look that results in soft, muted tones and a soft hand.
Polyester strong, durable synthetic fabric with high strength and excellent resiliency. Low moisture absorbency allows the fabric to dry quickly.

 

Poly-Filled A warm polyester lining found in the body or sleeves of outerwear garments. It has more loft than a regular nylon lining.
Preshrunk Pre-shrinking is not about pre-washing the fabric. It is a process where the bolted, uncut fabric is run through rollers containing tiny nubs that press the fabric over the nubs, creating grooves which condense it. This puckered shrinking effect then allows for real shrinking to occur when washed, without it being detected. Therefore, the fabric – not the shirt – is pre-shrunk before it is even cut and sewn.
Raglan Sleeve An athletic cut sleeve set with a diagonal seam from the neck to the underarm. Offers more freedom of movement in comparison with set-in sleeves.
Spandex A manufactured elastomeric fiber that can be repeatedly stretched over 500% without breaking and will still recover to its original length
Stonewashed A finishing process that creates a distressed appearance, including a softer texture, puckering at the seams and slight wrinkling. Garments are tumbled together with stones (usually pumice stones) in larger washers. This process is usually applied to indigo-dyed denim garments. Different sizes of stones can be used and length of washing time can be varied to achieve different effects.
Wrinkle-Free The basic process for imparting the wrinkle free finish into fabric involves applying a resin into the fabric, drying and curing at extremely high temperatures to the desired dimension, scouring to remove any residual chemicals, and final drying. The application and curing of wrinkle-free may occur before or after the garments are produced. “Pre-cured wrinkle-free” means that the finish has been applied to the fabric before the garment has been manufactured. Because the “post-cure wrinkle-free” means that the finish has been applied after the garment has been manufactured and because the “post-cure wrinkle-free” process is set into the final, pressed garment, it is more popular.